Lori Dajose
Two Caltech postdoctoral scholars will receive up to $1.4 million in funding over eight years.
Lori Dajose
Genetically engineered viruses help the immune system target specific pathogens in unexpected ways.
Whitney Clavin
Scientists are learning how cells make the decision to become T cells.
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are thought to be the future for treating and preventing HIV infections. A bNAb recently characterized by Caltech researchers can neutralize HIV in different states—increasing the antibody's promise as a therapeutic.
Douglas Smith
Finding an anti-AIDS vaccine remains an elusive goal—partly because the HIV virus quickly mutates to evade the vaccine's antibodies. In a Watson Lecture on April 1, Caltech's Pamela J. Bjorkman will describe ways to neutralize that mutational advantage.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech researchers have developed antibody-based molecules that are hundreds of times better than our natural defenses at binding to and neutralizing the HIV virus.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Researchers around the country are adopting a technique developed in the Caltech lab of Nobel Laureate David Baltimore to try to guard against infection. The method, called VIP, was originally designed to trigger an immune response to HIV.
Kimm Fesenmaier
"The method that we developed has now been validated in the most natural possible setting in a mouse," says David Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech.
Katie Neith
Researchers at Caltech are the first to have utilized high-resolution electron microscopy to look at HIV infection within the actual tissue of an infected organism, providing perhaps the most detailed characterization yet of HIV infection in the gut.
Katie Neith

Pamela Bjorkman has been studying HIV at Caltech since 2005. In the lab, she has made significant gains in the fight against the virus, developing antibodies that neutralize most strains.

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