Emily Velasco
With its federal funding renewed for another five years, Caltech's Conte Center aims to tackle even more complex questions about how humans make decisions.
Lori Dajose
New research from Caltech clarifies the once-mysterious role of the amygdala.
Lori Dajose
Neurons specialized for processing faces in the human brain are controlled by attention, according to a new Caltech study.
Rod Pyle
New research into autism spectrum disorder (ASD), utilizing complex real-world images, provides enhanced understanding of how people with autism attend to these visual cues.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech researchers find the brain regions responsible for making snap decisions about cause and effect.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Neuroeconomists recognize that while decision making is complex and a bit messy, it is also so central to our daily lives that a better understanding could greatly enhance our grasp of human nature.
Katie Neith
Building on their prior work, a team of neuroscientists at Caltech now report that rare patients who are missing connections between the left and right sides of their brain show a strikingly high incidence of autism. The study is the first to show a link between the two disorders.
Katie Neith
Humans have a tendency to spontaneously synchronize their movements. For example, the footsteps of two friends walking together may synchronize, although neither individual is consciously aware that it is happening. Similarly, the clapping hands of an audience will naturally fall into synch. Although this type of synchronous body movement has been observed widely, its neurological mechanism and its role in social interactions remain obscure. A new study, led by cognitive neuroscientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), has found that body-movement synchronization between two participants increases following a short session of cooperative training, suggesting that our ability to synchronize body movements is a measurable indicator of social interaction.
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