open search form

News RSS Icon Subscribe via RSS

Determining a Stem Cell's Fate
04/12/2012

Determining a Stem Cell's Fate

Kimm Fesenmaier
In studies that mark a major step forward in our understanding of stem cells' fates, a team of Caltech researchers has traced the stepwise developmental process that ensures certain stem cells will become T cells—cells of the immune system that help destroy invading pathogens.
Alexander Varshavsky Awarded Otto Warburg Medal
04/02/2012

Alexander Varshavsky Awarded Otto Warburg Medal

Allison Benter

Alexander Varshavsky, Caltech's Howard and Gwen Laurie Smits Professor of Cell Biology, has been awarded the Otto Warburg Medal of the German Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM). The medal is considered to be the highest German award for biochemists and molecular biologists.

 

Do You Hear What I Hear?
03/08/2012

Do You Hear What I Hear?

Katie Neith
Caltech biologists have identified how and where the brain processes the acoustic signals essential to human communication.
Understanding Bacterial Sensors
02/29/2012

Understanding Bacterial Sensors

Kimm Fesenmaier

Nearly all motile bacteria can sense and respond to their surroundings through a process called chemotaxis, which begins with proteins known as chemoreceptors. Now researchers at Caltech have built the first model that depicts precisely how chemoreceptors and the proteins around them are structured at the sensing tip of bacteria. Because chemotaxis plays a critical role in the first steps of bacterial infection, a better understanding of the process could pave the way for the development of new, more effective antibiotics.

Some Bacteria Attack Using Spring-loaded Poison Daggers
02/27/2012

Some Bacteria Attack Using Spring-loaded Poison Daggers

Kimm Fesenmaier
Bacteria have evolved different systems for secreting proteins. A team of Caltech-led researchers proposes that one of those systems might work by shooting spring-loaded poison molecular daggers.
Caltech Researchers Develop Gene Therapy to Boost Brain Repair for Demyelinating Diseases
02/08/2012

Caltech Researchers Develop Gene Therapy to Boost Brain Repair for Demyelinating Diseases

Katie Neith

Researchers from Caltech now believe they have found a way to help the brain replace damaged myelin, a material that forms a protective cape around the axons of our nerve cells so that they can send signals quickly and efficiently.

Two Caltech Researchers Receive Frontiers of Knowledge Award
02/07/2012

Two Caltech Researchers Receive Frontiers of Knowledge Award

Katie Neith

For their work in information and communication technologies, and biomedicine, Carver Mead, Moore Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Science, and Alexander Varshavsky, Smits Professor of Cell Biology, have been honored by the BBVA Foundation as recipients of 2011 Frontiers of Knowledge awards. 

Making Sense of Sensory Connections
01/25/2012

Making Sense of Sensory Connections

Katie Neith

A key feature of human and animal brains is that they are adaptive; they are able to change their structure and function based on input from the environment and on the potential associations, or consequences, of that input. To learn more about such neural adaptability, researchers at Caltech have explored the brains of insects and identified a mechanism by which the connections in their brain change to form new and specific memories of smells.

 

Alexander Varshavsky Receives King Faisal International Prize for Science
01/25/2012

Alexander Varshavsky Receives King Faisal International Prize for Science

Katie Neith

Alexander Varshavsky, Caltech's Howard and Gwen Laurie Smits Professor of Cell Biology, has been awarded the 2012 King Faisal International Prize (KFIP) for Science. The winners of the prize, which also includes awards for medicine, Arabic language and literature, Islamic studies, and service to Islam, were announced in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on January 16. 

 

Connecting the Dots
01/13/2012

Connecting the Dots

Katie Neith
A multidisciplinary approach to building implantable neural devices could help blind people see, paralyzed people stand, and even endow robotic limbs with a sense of touch.
image of dots connected by lines